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+ alexandraelle:

stretch marks and all. sometimes I love them and other times it’s hard to. however, they are mine and deeply rooted. these lines represent my growth. these lines are proof of a journey that belongs only to me. xo

alexandraelle:

stretch marks and all. sometimes I love them and other times it’s hard to. however, they are mine and deeply rooted. these lines represent my growth. these lines are proof of a journey that belongs only to me. xo

poupeesolitaire:

Candid photo of woman wearing high heel platform shoes – Central Park, New York – 1973

poupeesolitaire:

Candid photo of woman wearing high heel platform shoes – Central Park, New York – 1973

Posted 1 hour ago.
+ guardian:

Fan Ho is one of Asia’s most beloved street photographers, capturing the spirit of Hong Kong in the 1950s and 60s. His work shows a love of people combined with unexpected, geometric constructions and a sense of drama heightened by use of smoke and light. More
Approaching Shadow, 1954. Photo: Fan Ho/AO Vertical Art Space

guardian:

Fan Ho is one of Asia’s most beloved street photographers, capturing the spirit of Hong Kong in the 1950s and 60s. His work shows a love of people combined with unexpected, geometric constructions and a sense of drama heightened by use of smoke and light. More

Approaching Shadow, 1954. Photo: Fan Ho/AO Vertical Art Space

Posted 1 hour ago.
+ trvpcess:


boopbunny:

truu!!!!!!

me and bae pls? thank u

trvpcess:

boopbunny:

truu!!!!!!

me and bae pls? thank u

Posted 1 hour ago.
+ tashabilities:

shmurdapunk:

jean-luc-gohard:

So parskis brought to my attention this conversation going on about the Steve McQueen HBO series auditions and the casting of a very lightskinned Australian in the lead role on karnythia's twitter. Those of you who were following me like two months ago when the open call went down know I was there that day.
I was in line for several hours and didn’t even get within a block of the door, but there were people who were there for twelve hours or more. Sometime before I had to leave for work, one of the dudes next to me in line started getting updates from a friend of his who was inside. He had been there since 8 AM and had just gotten inside. He told his friend that they were sending all but the prettiest darkskinned dudes home and aside from those prettiest dudes, the only people seeing the casting directors were lightskinned.
It’s fucked up that this is accepted practice in the industry and it’s fucked up that our own filmmakers, once they’ve made it, are perpetuating it.

wow, what the fuck

Not at ALL surprised. Just like Ava Duvernay got a Black Brit playing Dr. King.Couldn’t find a Black American actor for nothin.

Steve McQueen, I am disappointed.

tashabilities:

shmurdapunk:

jean-luc-gohard:

So parskis brought to my attention this conversation going on about the Steve McQueen HBO series auditions and the casting of a very lightskinned Australian in the lead role on karnythia's twitter. Those of you who were following me like two months ago when the open call went down know I was there that day.

I was in line for several hours and didn’t even get within a block of the door, but there were people who were there for twelve hours or more. Sometime before I had to leave for work, one of the dudes next to me in line started getting updates from a friend of his who was inside. He had been there since 8 AM and had just gotten inside. He told his friend that they were sending all but the prettiest darkskinned dudes home and aside from those prettiest dudes, the only people seeing the casting directors were lightskinned.

It’s fucked up that this is accepted practice in the industry and it’s fucked up that our own filmmakers, once they’ve made it, are perpetuating it.

wow, what the fuck

Not at ALL surprised. 

Just like Ava Duvernay got a Black Brit playing Dr. King.

Couldn’t find a Black American actor for nothin.

Steve McQueen, I am disappointed.

"Diamonds’s rationale for calling Snoop Dogg a sell out is that Snoop has made a career out of portraying himself as a pimp and degrading black women, but he has never been compelled to apologize for his disrespect until it was aimed at a white woman."

teabreakfast.com (via niggaimdeadass)

I JUST saw the apology today.

FUCK SNOOP. (via tashabilities)

Posted 1 hour ago.
+ Leonard Kravitz is the bae.

Leonard Kravitz is the bae.

dynastylnoire:

lsferr:

africanaquarian:

4C jesus please keep this wild ass Ouija shit off my dash

image

halelluuuu

image

4C Jesus has been officially added to my vocabulary!!!

Woo! I’m not big on feeling obligated to educate ignorant white folk like I was when I was younger. I’ve retired from that pointless shit. Yet I’ll make an exception regarding Ouija boards. Them things ain’t a toy!!! Some of y’all better tell Becky and Trent before they conjure up some shadow people or worse at a place you can’t run from easily like your job or home share.

postracialcomments:

My sister speaking about my niece (on the right)

We’ve made sure to instill pride in all of our nieces and nephews. It’s hard however when you have other Black kids who feel otherwise.

Make sure you tell a Black girl and/or boy that they are beautiful today. Tell them their hair is beautiful and their skin is gorgeous. We have to rebuild the esteems of the kids in our community.

I love small children with big hair! I support the message of fortifying out little ones with the self-knowledge and self-love they will need to protect their well-beings in this harsh and hateful world.

Posted 2 hours ago.

tashabilities:

sapphrikah:

celestethebest:

didi-is-spiffy:

drtgif:

blackinasia:

High Level:

Key Excerpt:

But recent research published in the American Sociological Association’sSociology of Educationjournal shows that my gender (male) was one of the determinative factors in the relative ease of my social integration. Inan articlepublished last year, Megan M. Holland, a professor at the University of Buffalo and a recent Harvard Ph.D., studied the social impact of a desegregation program on the minority students who were being bussed to a predominantly white high school in suburban Boston. She found that minority boys, because of stereotypes about their supposed athleticism and “coolness,” fit in better than minority girls because the school gave the boys better opportunities to interact with white students. Minority boys participated in sports and non-academic activities at much higher rates. Over the course of her study, she concluded that structural factors in the school as well as racial narratives about minority males resulted in increased social rewards for the boys, while those same factors contributed to the isolation of girls in the diversity program.

Another study looked at a similar program, called Diversify. Conducted by Simone Ispa-Landa at Northwestern University,it showedhow gender politics and gender performance impacted the way the minority students were seen at the school. The study shows that “as a group, the Diversify boys were welcomed in suburban social cliques, even as they were constrained to enacting race and gender in narrow ways.” Diversify girls, on the other hand, “were stereotyped as ‘ghetto’ and ‘loud’”—behavior that, when exhibited by the boys in the program, was socially rewarded. Another finding from her study was that because of the gender dynamics present at the school—the need to conform to prevalent male dominance in the school—“neither the white suburban boys nor the black Diversify boys were interested in dating” the minority girls. The girls reported being seen by boys at their schools as “aggressive” and not having the “Barbie doll” look. The boys felt that dating the white girls was “easier” because they “can’t handle the black girls.”  

The black boys in Ispa-Landa’s study found themselves in peculiar situations in which they would play into stereotypes of black males as being cool or athletic by seeming “street-smart.” At the same time, though, they would work to subvert those racial expectations by code-switching both their speech and mannerisms to put their white classmates at ease. Many of the boys reported feeling safer and freer at the suburban school, as they would not be considered “tough” at their own schools. It was only in the context of the suburban school that their blackness conferred social power. In order to maintain that social dominance, the boys engaged in racial performance, getting into show fights with each other to appear tough and using rough, street language around their friends.

In the case of the girls, the urban signifiers that gave the boys so much social acceptance, were held against them. While the boys could wear hip-hop clothing, the girls were seen as “ghetto” for doing the same. While the boys could display a certain amount of aggression, the girls felt they were penalized for doing so. Ispa-Landa, in an interview, expressed surprise at “how much of a consensus there was among the girls about their place in the school.” She also found that overall, the girls who participated in diversity programs paid a social cost because they “failed to embody characteristics of femininity” that would have valorized them in the school hierarchy. They also felt excluded from the sports and activities that gave girls in those high schools a higher social status, such as cheerleading and Model U.N., because most activities ended too late for the parents of minority girls. Holland notes that minority parents were much more protective of the girls; they expressed no worries about the boys staying late, or over at friend’s houses.  

Once minority women leave high school and college, they are shown to continue to struggle with social integration, even as they achieve higher educational outcomes and, in certain locales, higher incomes than minority men. Though, as presaged by high-school sexual politics, they were stillthree times less likelythan black men to marry outside of their race.

This is exactly why discussions about intersectionality are so incredibly important, and I can also attest to this personally. My little sister (1 grade below me) and I attended the same 90% white elementary school. I was, at first, the only black boy in my class and she was the only black girl (and black person period) in her class. Despite being shy and bookish at the time, I still benefited from being tokenized as a black male in my class. My sister, who was much more strong-minded and outspoken than I was, was summarily tortured by her classmates (white girls especially) and her teachers for years. Eventually it was so bad that she was forced to transfer out, even as I continued on at the school without many problems. 

The year after she transferred out, another black boy transferred into my class. This boy was athletic and his manner of speech, mannerisms, etc. instantly endeared him to all of the white people in the class. He performed blackness in a way that our white peers wanted to see, and he was immediately one of the most popular kids in the class, in a way that I never was.

There is a performance of blackness that occurs before white audiences, as per white supremacist tropes which constrain and define “blackness” in narrow ways, and this is a performance which many black people can feel compelled to engage in, inhabiting the associated stereotypes for social capital from their white peers. But this is also a performance that black males can benefit disproportionately from socially in white spaces even as black women get criticized and demonized (including, paradoxically, by black men!!!) for the same behavior.

Great article, click through the link for the full piece by .

This was enlightening. Shocked when reading the title but I can agree

This honestly wasn’t surprising to me at all, I saw this all the time, just kinda crazy to see it laid out so officially, this is why we need to talk about intersectionality

Water is wet. The sky is up.

This is how it has been in society. Not. Surprising. At all.

Black Americanness is matriarchal.

Black WOMEN are the keepers of our culture, the source of most of our language and dance, the primary caregivers, the main ones combing these heads, teaching the hand games and jump rope songs, passing down the recipes and shea buttering these babies.

When a Black man leaves the Black community to find a wife, he usually doesn’t take much of our culture with him, resulting in children without a strong Black identity, especially if the wife is white,

Because your mother is your first teacher.

You come from HER womb, you learn the ways of HER people FIRST.

But somehow, in a mess of misogynoir, white folks got it in their heads that Black MALES are the source of Black cool.

So Black boys are more accepted by white ass environments than Black girls are,

Cause they want Black, but not TOO Black, now.

Posted 6 hours ago.